Staff – Nailed Magazine https://nailedmagazine.com Thu, 15 Aug 2019 12:00:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.10 Charlottesville Hatred by Taliesin Gillkes-Bower https://nailedmagazine.com/photography/charlottesville-hatred-taliesin-gillkes-bower/ Mon, 28 Aug 2017 09:00:04 +0000 https://nailedmagazine.com/?post_type=photography&p=16645   A photo essay by Taliesin Gillkes-Bower. + + + Taliesin Gilkes-Bower: I woke up Monday to posts on Instagram from Anti-Racist organizers in the Charlottesville calling for more bodies, especially white bodies, to come put themselves on the line to protest the Unite The Right “rally.” It felt important, but I waffled for a few days about my place there, […]

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A photo essay by Taliesin Gillkes-Bower.

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Taliesin Gilkes-Bower: I woke up Monday to posts on Instagram from Anti-Racist organizers in the Charlottesville calling for more bodies, especially white bodies, to come put themselves on the line to protest the Unite The Right “rally.” It felt important, but I waffled for a few days about my place there, and the world’s need for more images of white supremacists, or any amplification of their message.

Like many white people unaccustomed to the constant threat and real consequences of racist violence and oppression I had some sympathy to the argument that we should just ignore white supremacist’s public actions and hope they go away. After my experience in Charlottesville, I no longer hold that delusional excuse for inaction.

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Taliesin Gilkes-Bower Photography Nailed Magazine

Taliesin Gilkes-Bower is an artist and photographer based in Bolinas, California. Their work focuses on creative community driven responses to oppression. They are currently working on long term research projects around interstellar communication, intentional communities, and government transparency. More photo work can be found here, or on Instagram here.

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Interview with Astrologer Chani Nicholas https://nailedmagazine.com/interview/interview-with-astrologer-chani-nicholas/ Mon, 07 Aug 2017 15:09:49 +0000 https://nailedmagazine.com/?post_type=interview&p=16597 Center the Margins: Astrologer Chani Nicholas on Ancestry, Race, and Acknowledging the Moment This interview was conducted by Maiga Milbourne, and has been condensed and edited. + As Astrologer Chani Nicholas and I were speaking, Trump had just pulled the US from the Paris Accords. The grief and outrage pouring from social media was fresh […]

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Center the Margins: Astrologer Chani Nicholas on Ancestry, Race, and Acknowledging the Moment

This interview was conducted by Maiga Milbourne, and has been condensed and edited.

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As Astrologer Chani Nicholas and I were speaking, Trump had just pulled the US from the Paris Accords. The grief and outrage pouring from social media was fresh on my mind.

Since the election, this is not uncommon. Following a long lineage of seekers struggling to make sense of the chaos of our experience, I, and roughly 200,000 readers a week turn to Chani.

NAILED MAGAZINE: One of the things that interests me about your work is that it’s both very immediate– the planets as they’re interacting in this particular moment– but it’s also very ancient and far-reaching.

CHANI NICHOLAS: Everything is about timing. As an astrologer, you have a perspective that tells you that things will change because you can see the patterns coming up in the future.

The temporality is really fascinating because [it] is [itself] another art form. [Many] different spiritual disciplines create art out of substances that will blow away or get washed away. It’s the discipline of doing something for the sake of that moment and then it’s gone.

One of my colleagues, Barry Perlman says “it’s like a zen exercise.” You put all this effort, time, labor, and physical energy into writing one horoscope for one week. Twelve times twelve [horoscopes] for every week of the year. Every moment, every astrological signature is a wave that rises and then falls. As an astrologer, I want to meet them.

NAILED: Do you feel like you’re working traditionally as an astrologer? 

NICHOLAS: It’s really important to me to understand the roots of whatever I do, the peoples and the places on the earth that these practices come from. If I’m going to study and devote my life to something then I want to understand the ancestors that carried it forward. Studying astrology’s giant, vast history has been really important for me. It isn’t easily summed up, because it incorporates a lot of peoples, cultures, and religions. But I get off on the complexity of it.

As a Jew, I was excited to learn that some Rabbis that have been quoted for a long time in Judaism, were also astrologers. I had to learn that through my astrological teachers, because in modern day Jewish culture astrology is often looked down upon. Being able to connect myself to my astrological work through my religious and cultural background is important to me.

NAILED: What was the work like for the astrologers for various moments in time?

NICHOLAS: It depends on what culture and time frame we’re looking at. The lineage of western astrology is very broken and fragmented. One empire would be colonized by another and the astrology would be utilized by that governing power or have to go underground here and there. One culture would pillage and ransack another they would steal the knowledge of that culture, and part of the knowledge was, for a very long time, the astrology of those people. What we call traditional western astrology was mostly hidden from us for years. The way astrology has been practiced has varied over the span of about 2,000 years. Sometimes it was an integral part of the culture and sometimes it was something that was pushed to the margins.

NAILED: The lineage question has particular bearing on race especially as it’s playing out in the west right now. As white people wielding white privilege and trauma, what does it look like to resituate ourselves in lineage, culture, and spirituality?

NICHOLAS: Those of us that have white privilege have a profound responsibility to dismantle and work towards healing the effects, both internal and external, of white supremacy. It is a deep and disturbing wound that we have inherited and it is of absolute importance that we engage with it, interrogate it, acknowledge it, talk about it, read about it, that we are the student of the effects of it. White supremacy touches everything– destroys and poisons everything on this planet. We can link it to every other oppression. But it is something that white people have such a violent reaction to when told that they benefit from it. The benefits of white privilege create a bubble that people that benefit from it get to live within. White folks are mostly so resistant to addressing it, and so adamant to holding on to this kind of power, this weapon that causes such incredible destruction. The kind of destruction that folks with white privilege never have to understand if they don’t actively try to. It is our greatest spiritual corruption—made stronger by intersecting with sexism, misogyny, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, and the degradation of the earth.

We have to centralize those that are most marginalized in our struggles. [Those of us with privilege] can ignore [the suffering of others] if we want because that’s what privilege lets us do. But privilege only makes us more vulnerable to the spiritual corruption that is apathy– it inhibits our growth.

NAILED: What has the response been to your writing on whiteness?

NICHOLAS: I get a lot of emails from white people that are enraged asking me “how dare you tell me I’m a bad person.” I get a lot of white tears. It is always disheartening in terms of the powerful resistance to reflection that privilege engenders. I often wonder, “What is it that will get through?” The ego rages anytime it feels attacked. It wants to set every reflection on fire.

A lot of people unfollow me, get very angry with me, and disappointed in me. I’m always honored when someone is disappointed in me because who the hell did you think I was? I’m just a person. And also, great, let’s talk about that. What did you expect? That I was here just to make you feel good? What was it that disappointed you?

NAILED: Was there a point in your life when you were unconscious about systems of oppression and were brought into consciousness and contextualized within them?

NICHOLAS: Because I have white privilege I have been able to, at certain points in my life, be engaged with trying to deconstruct systems of oppression and then not be. I have cis privilege, I have ability privilege, I have the privilege of growing up in Canada with health care and education, I have privilege in many different ways. Over the course of my life I’ve been able to be deeply engaged with activism and then because of my privilege I’ve been able to step back and do deep healing work on myself and not be engaged in the world. I’m not proud of my disengagement and I recognize that I got to do that because I could. Because of my privilege. We all need time out once in awhile, but we don’t all get to take it.

I don’t think that we are really healing ourselves unless or until our healing leads us to some kind of justice work, and hopefully our justice work leads us to some kind of healing.

I always think, especially in America, that ancestry is such an important thing to investigate. Folks with white privilege must make it our work in some way to say “[white supremacy is] making me and the rest of this world deeply unwell. It is my responsibility to try and heal this. To try and create some kind of justice. Otherwise it just gets passed on and on and on. This needs to stop with me.”

You said, when we were talking about whiteness earlier, that my comments felt like “a balm.” I think it feels like a balm because when we grow up in dysfunction–when we hear someone say “what happened to you isn’t OK and that was cruel and that was abuse”–we feel soothed. If we’re not defensive and too connected to our fragility and we’re ready to do something, when all of the ills of white supremacy are articulated it feels like a relief because we’re like “I knew something was deeply wrong!” We have to be able to label it and witness it in order to heal from it.

I talk with white people all the time that are always like “I don’t have a lineage of my own so it’s OK if I am culturally appropriative. I need this headdress!!” No! You have a lineage! That’s your goldmine! Your lineage is connected to all kinds of things that make you uncomfortable, ashamed, and repelled. It’s your job to make use of it. To look in the face of your shame, of your family, and see what is yours to heal. Expose it and work to heal it and see what else can come from it. See what can come from the truth.


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maiga milbournePassionate about healthy bodies and communities, Maiga Milbourne is a E-RYT vinyasa yoga instructor, avid traveler, retreat developer, activist, and creative writer. Maiga has thousands of hours teaching yoga to students of varying mobilities in a multitude of spaces. In February 2016 she studied Jivamukti yoga at Radhanath Swami’s ashram outside of Mumbai, India. Maiga has been published in The Yoga Diaries anthology, featured in The Feminist Wire, and Chrysalis JournalMaiga met her husband as a fellow activist doing work against mass incarceration and behalf of political prisoners. She and her husband are slowly converting their suburban backyard into a permaculture-influenced food forest. Join her on retreat to Portugal this September 2017! Learn more at her website, here.

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astrologer Chani NicholasChani Nicholas has been a student of astrology for over 30 years and a counseling astrologer for 20. Many of her ideas, philosophies, and concepts have been and are constantly shaped by LGBTQI2S, POC, feminist writers, artists, thinkers, activists, and community members as well as by her many brilliant colleagues and students. She aims to make astrology by making it practical, approachable, and useful. Visit her website, here.

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NAILED Songs of the Week #50 https://nailedmagazine.com/music/nailed-songs-of-the-week-50/ Fri, 10 Feb 2017 01:01:16 +0000 http://www.nailedmagazine.com/?post_type=music&p=15532   + + + Fiona George, Columnist and Contributor of NAILED: “If You’re Crying” – IAN SWEET High pitched airy screech-sing. Home-video-style nostalgia. The way my generation feels love. IAN SWEET’s got it down. From Hardly Art Records, I had high expectations, clicking into this video for the first song I ever heard from them. I […]

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Fiona George, Columnist and Contributor of NAILED:

“If You’re Crying” – IAN SWEET

High pitched airy screech-sing. Home-video-style nostalgia. The way my generation feels love. IAN SWEET’s got it down.

From Hardly Art Records, I had high expectations, clicking into this video for the first song I ever heard from them. I seriously cannot stress how much this label is the shit, and as follows how much IAN SWEET is the shit.

This song will tell you an old story in a new way; your first love.

Their debut EP only a few months old, they’re on their way to following Shannon and the Clams and Chastity Belt as Hardly Art artists with cult-like followings.

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Carrie Seitzinger, Editor-in-Chief of NAILED:

“Night Drive” – Ari Lennox

Ari Lennox’s EP PHO came out about 6 months ago, a long-waited followup to Ariography (2013). I can definitely hear the influences of Erykah Badu and Minnie Riperton. There is an ease in Lennox’s vocals and delivery, and in this song even in the stringing together of images that take you perfectly on a city-lit drive on a tryst on a night where forgiveness and hopes are flowing.

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Guest Editor: Joe Blair, Writer and NAILED Contributor:

“La Vie C’est Bon” – Vaudou Game

Now may not exactly be the right time to declare that life is bon, bon, bon, bon, bon, bon, bon, bon, but it’s important to take a break from the doom that many of us are feeling in our bones at this moment. On another note, one of the fantasies I don’t often share is that I’d like to be a DJ. More specifically, I’d like to have the jammingest world beats in my set list, boogie tunes that summon up everyone’s courage to shake it, even if none of the lyrics are sung in a language that anyone’s ever heard of. World beats, funk disco, African sounds, all of it. If you’re a regular at the club where I spin, then you’re already familiar with Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou, and you can feel the West African sounds of Benin and Togo, and 70s-inspired Afro-groove in your blood.

Of course, in the case of Vaudou Game and Peter Solo’s lyrics, we’ve all heard of French. Remember, don’t take it all too seriously. We still have to get up and shake it sometimes.

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Shenyah Webb, Arts Editor of NAILED:

“I Don’t Wanna be Funny Anymore” – Lucy Dacus

I dedicate this song to me.

I discovered this song on XRAY.fm while stuck for hours in snowstorm traffic. It’s catchy, charming, and familiar. It completely resonated with how I had been feeling about myself: like I’m not taken seriously. When I paint, make music, or write, I often feel that the acknowledgment I receive is out of sympathy. Encouragement, but with an underlying current of, “you’re doing great for what you’ve been through,” or like I’m artistic but not an actual artist.

This song serves as an important reminder: to let go of this craving for esteem, and to continue to hone my craft – a reminder that what I create isn’t for validation. It’s for the mere process of creating and sharing meaningful art.

Shortly after discovering the music of Lucy Dacus, I purchased her newly released debut album, No Burden. I highly recommend adding it to your vinyl collection. Full of surprises, powerful, and most of all – comforting.

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Check out Songs of the Week #49 for even more great music from the editors and contributors behind NAILED.

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Portland’s Women’s March by Maggie Jane Cech https://nailedmagazine.com/photography/portlands-womens-march-maggie-jane-cech/ Thu, 26 Jan 2017 10:00:08 +0000 http://www.nailedmagazine.com/?post_type=photography&p=15827 + + + Maggie Jane Cech is a Life Portrait/Documentary Photographer and Interior/Prop Stylist + Photographer based in Portland, Oregon. The driving force behind the camera in MJ’s hand is to create images that will be a source of inspiration, healing, and connection for us to stand up, speak out, and use our voices and […]

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Maggie Jane Cech, photographer NAILED MagazineMaggie Jane Cech is a Life Portrait/Documentary Photographer and Interior/Prop Stylist + Photographer based in Portland, Oregon. The driving force behind the camera in MJ’s hand is to create images that will be a source of inspiration, healing, and connection for us to stand up, speak out, and use our voices and actions to create positive change in ourselves and the world around us. Even though she probably hasn’t met you, chances are highly likely that she wants to take your photo.

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NAILED Songs of the Week #49 https://nailedmagazine.com/music/nailed-songs-week-49/ Fri, 02 Dec 2016 20:08:18 +0000 http://www.nailedmagazine.com/?post_type=music&p=15403   Carrie Seitzinger, Editor-in-Chief of NAILED: “Maiden Voyage Suite” – Signor Benedick the Moor I’m amazed Signor Benedick the Moor isn’t famous yet or even very well-known. He creates his own beats with various instruments, writes intelligently and ingeniously, and raps with commanding presence. Watch this one burn brighter and louder before your eyes (and […]

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Carrie Seitzinger, Editor-in-Chief of NAILED:

“Maiden Voyage Suite” – Signor Benedick the Moor

I’m amazed Signor Benedick the Moor isn’t famous yet or even very well-known. He creates his own beats with various instruments, writes intelligently and ingeniously, and raps with commanding presence. Watch this one burn brighter and louder before your eyes (and ears).

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Fiona George, Columnist and Contributor of NAILED:

“Four Walls” – Harsh Crowd

Can I just say, first off, that this is a group of fucking fourteen year old girls. The excitement of this band is how they already know how to put a song together like nobody’s business, and know what they want to say.

What’s exciting about this band is they break the indie rock mold. In a genre filled with twenty-something waifish white women and twenty-something waifish bearded white men, they are refreshing and the future.

What is exciting about this band, is that they hold the potential to let us see their voices mature, their skills increase, and their songwriting distill as we see them grow up as people and musicians.

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Matty Byloos, Publisher and Contributing Editor of NAILED:

“Memory” – Preoccupations

I can’t remember where we were, where were we when we all went under? Does everyone want to become something else? It’s difficult to see evolution when it’s happening, but you can feel the yearning in your own body, in the bodies of others. Discomfort and desire create growth. If the magic behind a piece of music is just one of those people, repurposing their skin and bones, then why shouldn’t songs also struggle to become something else? “Memory” is always at best an approximation of a thing. There’s slippage and more slippage. But memories are the things we get to keep, not the things that actually happened in our lives. Those things are gone. Already becoming something else the second after they’ve happened. Eventually, it’s all remembrance. Memory holds on to us the same way we try to keep it whole inside. But really, everything is dying all the time. Remembering is just saying goodbye in slow motion. How you might say, I promise that I’ll burn your things when you’re dead and gone.

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Shenyah Webb, Arts Editor of NAILED:

“Fall Into Me” – Alev Lenz

Fans of Black Mirror may recognize this piece. Although I find the series to be on-point and brilliant, this song deserves a space of its own. It is one of the most captivating works of art I have had the pleasure of becoming eaten by in a very long time. Thick warm cellos with verses that seem to hold a sacred message.

“Fall Into Me” is a piece that merits being listened to in its entirety. It holds a hallowed space throughout, while building a calm tension to the very end. Mesmerizing and timeless.

A catalyst for opening, her voices finding rest in my insides.

Fall into me,
And drown inside me
I know you will see,
The beauty of me

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Check out Songs of the Week #48 for even more great music from the editors and contributors behind NAILED.

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Portland Election Protests by Victor Frey https://nailedmagazine.com/photography/portland-election-protests-victor-frey/ Fri, 18 Nov 2016 21:57:35 +0000 http://www.nailedmagazine.com/?post_type=photography&p=15515 + + + Life was on the verge of overwhelming Victor Frey until he picked up a camera. Now he has more pictures of cats then he ever thought possible.

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Life was on the verge of overwhelming Victor Frey until he picked up a camera. Now he has more pictures of cats then he ever thought possible.

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NAILED Songs of the Week #48 https://nailedmagazine.com/music/nailed-songs-week-48/ Thu, 22 Sep 2016 17:21:19 +0000 http://www.nailedmagazine.com/?post_type=music&p=15197 #SOTW: SAN FRANCISCO EDITION + Guest Editor: Brian S. Ellis, Poet and Author (most recently of Often Go Awry, 2015) “Live at the Lab” – Horaflora In the Disney Animated Film, Wreck It Ralph, characters from beloved arcade games come to life and go on various adventures. But what if, not the game’s characters, but […]

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#SOTW: SAN FRANCISCO EDITION

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Guest Editor: Brian S. Ellis, Poet and Author (most recently of Often Go Awry, 2015)

“Live at the Lab” – Horaflora

In the Disney Animated Film, Wreck It Ralph, characters from beloved arcade games come to life and go on various adventures. But what if, not the game’s characters, but the video cabinets themselves came to life? What would their voices sound like? If whales could play instruments, would they go brass, or would they go percussion because they can already kinda’ make those sounds? What kind of music would robotic dogs from the future like the least? Horaflora, the longtime musical project of insta-composer Raub Roy, answers some of these questions. The best way to see Horaflora is live, but video and recordings can bring us close to the textural experience that Horaflora builds. Raub is a member of the Oakland-based Life Changing Ministries, a venue and collective. His recordings can be found online and elsewhere through his label Weird Ear Records.

 

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Matty Byloos, Publisher and Contributing Editor of NAILED:

“Real Life” – Dick Stusso

It’s probably after 9 in the morning when you finally make the decision, finally get the courage. You found one of those bars that opens at 6am after having closed down at 2am, earlier that same morning. All the things that could happen to a person in four hours. Hell, all the things that could happen in four minutes. You’ve been on a bar stool for three hours and change, still drunk from last night, when it hits you. Time to move on, from out of the dark.

Open the door of the bar onto the world outside and the light is all golden, the way you remember the pictures of your family from the 80s. What was the reason for getting drunk this time? Who even knows anymore. But it blurs memories into something you can almost believe really happened. And doesn’t that just make it all a little bit better when it hurts.

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Carrie Seitzinger, Editor-in-Chief of NAILED:

“Never Going Home” – Hazel English

So this is what underground pop music is now? Young wanderlust in cascading refrains of graceful treble and rolling weight-of-the-moment instrumental? Makes me feel a little better about the technological overload personal broadcasting of complete crap world we live in. Thank you, Hazel English.

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Shenyah Webb, Arts Editor of NAILED:

“In Every Heart” – Nightshuttle

This song summons visuals of how I imagined my adult life would look, how it would feel, how 10 year old me imagined myself now. (But now being in the 80s.)

1987 Detroit, Michigan suburbs.

It got dark early in the autumn months, the air was always crisp, the street lights glowed amber – the perfect time of year.

My mom drove a gold Mercury LN7 with the hatchback permanently down. Not driving shotgun was preferred, at least at night. The full skylight pinstriped the city sky with the little black lines running through the window. My reflection appearing and then disappearing with each street light. Laying in piles of fresh laundry, our night journeys were guided by the baritone voice and music selection of DJ Alan Almond’s Pillow Talk – Love song selections that seemed especially chosen for my mom and her dating life, and future me. Years in the future, it would be me driving at night, listening to music that seemed picked just for me, my eyes would be blue with heavy eye-shadow, I too would go to the laundromat at night, eat raspberries and yogurt whenever I wanted… This is what women did. This is what I would be doing then, in the 80s.

it’s the night, it’s the constant obligation
it’s a dream bearing infinite magnitude
take a note, take a letter, it’s an aberration
on the street where it all came back to you

in every heart
there is a nest
for every swallow
in every chest
in every heart

Nightshuttle’s “The City is Perfect Right Now” carries this at-once “then and now” theme through and through. It’s a nostalgic treasure. An album worth repeating. And this song, better with each listen. One that magically makes its way to your distant memories, like it was there all along.

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Check out Songs of the Week #47 for even more great music from the editors and contributors behind NAILED.

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NAILED Songs of the Week #47 https://nailedmagazine.com/music/nailed-songs-week-47/ Thu, 28 Jul 2016 09:00:48 +0000 http://www.nailedmagazine.com/?post_type=music&p=14992 Matty Byloos, Publisher and Contributing Editor of NAILED: “Risto’s Riff” – Moonface and Siinai Some music is out to get you. Some songs have a target on your back. There’s sniper in them. Virus. “Risto’s Riff” starts there, a thousand pencil marks on paper that ends with everything the color of graphite, more black than […]

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Matty Byloos, Publisher and Contributing Editor of NAILED:

“Risto’s Riff” – Moonface and Siinai

Some music is out to get you. Some songs have a target on your back. There’s sniper in them. Virus. “Risto’s Riff” starts there, a thousand pencil marks on paper that ends with everything the color of graphite, more black than black. It’s a song that names its first born Relentless and unleashes it upon the world. The 80s are happening again in music, a rebirth. It shows up in the space around the lead vocal, the wash of reverb and how everything drives toward the same tiny point in the distance. This isn’t a world that’s been created, it’s a mode of transport that moves too fast to jump off.

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Carrie Seitzinger, Editor-in-Chief of NAILED:

“Spirit” – Love’n’Joy

This kaleidoscopic, chilled out rock hails from Ukraine. It suits the warm carelessness of summer. Put it on and it will jam along wherever your day takes you.

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Shenyah Webb, Arts Editor of NAILED:

“Get Out” – Frightened Rabbit

“Get Out” is a beautiful commentary on unrequited love. Although it stands across any context, as good songs do, this video really hit home with me. Like most teen-age girls, crushing on boys with my girlfriends was typical; I liked the feminine ones with the soft features. Deep down I wanted to be like the boys, I wanted the girls to like me. It was an ongoing struggle to make sense of my desires.

We would hold each other and whisper fantasies in bed about them, be messengers for each other, give advice like we had it. Perfectly normal. Sometimes the fantasies would lead to role-play. I liked this. A lot. We would kiss, hold each other, masturbate side by side. I eventually had sex with one of them. Just once.

They always wanted it to be secret. As age grew us apart, it became increasingly difficult to suggest playing “boyfriend-girlfriend” and I finally grew the courage to be with a boy. Like the girl who stole my heart, he had a widow’s peak. Like the girl who stole my heart, we traded clothes and kisses.

Frighten Rabbit’s 2016 release Painting of a Panic Attack is a solid album from start to finish. It’s straightforward and emotionally rich. Filled with lyrical mastery, it paints vivid tales of honest reflection; heartache, addiction, displacement, loss, love, recovery… A must listen for the human soul.

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Guest Editor: Brian S. Ellis, Poet and Author (most recently of Often Go Awry, 2015)

“Hermit” – Cloud Becomes Your Hand

CBYH has an engine in their sound, a furious movement. They charge fully, gleefully and a little dangerously, into their music. Their sound is different, but not for difference’s sake. I like to think that this music is normal, somewhere, that there is some place in the world where CBYH is the most boring top 40 music available. I carried a piano on LSD with the violin player in this band once.

 

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Check out Songs of the Week #46 for even more great music from the editors and contributors behind NAILED.

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NAILED Songs of the Week #46 https://nailedmagazine.com/music/nailed-songs-of-the-week-46/ Wed, 15 Jun 2016 20:02:57 +0000 http://www.nailedmagazine.com/?post_type=music&p=14775 Carrie Seitzinger, Editor-in-Chief of NAILED: “Cecile” – Pumarosa When listening to Pumarosa I find that with my chest I’m tapping my foot to their moody, hefty songs. Their sound reminds me a bit of Tori Amos and Siouxsie and the Banshees. They are equal parts dream crackling, telepathy body dance, and perceived jazz. This is […]

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Carrie Seitzinger, Editor-in-Chief of NAILED:

“Cecile” – Pumarosa

When listening to Pumarosa I find that with my chest I’m tapping my foot to their moody, hefty songs. Their sound reminds me a bit of Tori Amos and Siouxsie and the Banshees. They are equal parts dream crackling, telepathy body dance, and perceived jazz. This is their newest video. Meet you at the meditation rock on the other side.

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Shenyah Webb, Arts Editor of NAILED:

“Bhikshu (Live)” – Hustle and Drone

Hustle and Drone is a beat-based trio that pairs a shitload of synths with beautiful three-part vocal harmonies. These three extremely talented musicians: Ryan Neighbors, Ryan Moore, and Andy Black, have their formula and epic electronic sound completely dialed in. When I caught their live show recently, they had at least 15 machines on stage with them; so many keys, pedals, buttons, and knobs, with little flashes. It was super pretty. I was mesmerized and it felt really right.

Although, it was nearly impossible to track what was coming from where with all of the gadgets (except for the bass guitar and vocals), there wasn’t a moment of muddiness. The sound was distinct, yet thickened by both buzzy and round bass, with layered vocals perfectly placed. Their sound was an explosion of pure lovely. These dudes know how to bring the magic, the same feeling you get when you are understood, like it is when all of the chaos moving around inside clicks together and makes sense or no sense, but it’s okay. Their stage presence, song writing, and overall feelings summoned through their music made them a newfound favorite for me!

Hustle and Drone’s next performance will be on August 24th at Doug Fir Lounge in Portland.

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Matty Byloos, Publisher and Contributing Editor of NAILED:

“Anxiety” – Preoccupations

Death is an old friend of mine; we go way back. It’s there all the time, a twin shadow, but one that goes before me. I’ve thought on my own death before, not in the suicidal sense, but in the acceptance sense — I’m fine with it. Mostly. A couple years ago, something shifted around inside. The thought of death, less abstract. More present than shadow. Something I carry with me, my breath, something closer. An anxiety. I’ll share a secret. There’s a mirror on the wall in my bedroom. From across the room, I can see half of my face when I’m laying in bed. With the lights just dim enough, when all there is to carve bodies out of darkness in the space is the blue and white glow of the television, I can squint my eyes closed soft enough to still see my face. It’s how I’ll look when I’m dead. I try to imagine friends, loved ones in front of my casket. Morbid, I realize, but honest nonetheless. An anxiety. The more I dwell in the imagining, the more my face looks lifeless in the mirror, deflated, made up. The more death becomes meaning, becomes alive. And this song is the cocoon of that imagining.

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Guest Editor, Adam Strong, writer and host of the reading series, Songbook, A Literary Mixtape.

“Drunk Drivers/Killer Whales” – Car Seat Head Rest

“In the backseat of my heart, My love tells me I’m a mess.” The song starts off with vocals coming in through the other end of a bad landline. “I couldn’t get the car to start.” We are here with them, here in this car, and he is drunk. Then there’s the kind of keyboard sound you’d hear in a horror film, the sound of a man dealing with the night before. The vocals from lead singer Will Toledo are high falsetto, the kind of thing you tell someone out of the corner of your mouth, the kind of thing you never cop to, how he couldn’t get the car to start, this drunk driving the thing we already know is wrong, but it just gets easier for him.

“It comes and goes in plateaus, one month later I’m a fucking pro.”

He is talking though the process, his thoughts happen at the same speed as the lyrics, we share the shame. Then he goes on about how this car ride or rides by this point is all a part of an overall coasting that’s happening to him. It’s the kind of line that only works when it’s as well-earned as it is here.

“But if we learned to live like this maybe we can learn how to start again.”

It’s delivered in such a bittersweet way, like admitting this to himself was half the battle. Like this whole drinking and driving thing is a way to figure out this whole adult thing. Then the chorus kicks in and it’s a chorus that will be stuck inside your head all summer.

“It doesn’t have be like this, it doesn’t have to be like this, killer whales, killer whales.”

Sooner or later he’s got to turn this problem around. He’s running out of chances to make the kinds of mistakes kids can still make. And by the end, these thoughts are going around in his head like the chorus we can’t help but sing along with. And through this there’s a voice developing in his head. And this voice is “giving you shit again, but you know he loves you, he does not mean to cause you pain.”

He’s taking himself to the next time when he wants to drink and drive and this time he will listen to the voice in his head, to pull the keys out of the car, to have the guts to grow up, to face the facts that the things we do affect other people, that it’s up to us to take responsibility, to get out of the car, and walk.

 

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Check out Songs of the Week #45 for even more great music from the editors and contributors behind NAILED.

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NAILED Songs of the Week #45 https://nailedmagazine.com/music/nailed-songs-week-45/ Fri, 20 May 2016 09:00:58 +0000 http://www.nailedmagazine.com/?post_type=music&p=14654 Matty Byloos, Publisher and Contributing Editor of NAILED: “Butterfly” – Twin Peaks That guy in front of you in the middle of nowhere walks into the gas station mini mart and you just know he’s living on stale beef jerky, red vines and orange soda. You’re jealous ’cause you know he sees more of everything […]

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Matty Byloos, Publisher and Contributing Editor of NAILED:

“Butterfly” – Twin Peaks

That guy in front of you in the middle of nowhere walks into the gas station mini mart and you just know he’s living on stale beef jerky, red vines and orange soda. You’re jealous ’cause you know he sees more of everything than you ever will. The way the north will always be jealous of the south. The way fast is jealous of slow, or city and the tall green grass with the sound of crickets. He’s sloppy in all the right ways. Drinks worse beer than you and enjoys it better. There’s a charity to him. He spends more time in the garage then you ever dreamed possible. His name rhymes with something psychedelic. You have every reason to hate him, but you can’t, so you don’t.

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Shenyah Webb, Arts Editor of NAILED:

“Spaceship” – Peacock Affect

Sometimes a sad song is all you need to remind you that you are human.

I remember sitting with my boombox, a removable speaker to each ear, laying on my bed waiting for something to happen when I pushed play. Songs on repeat, songs to summon the confusion of being me. Feeling it at the edge of my insides, trying to get out, getting closer with each repeat. The tears would eventually come, giving me a reason to feel. Releasing me from my chamber of teenage boredom, confirming that I was alone, that I wanted out, yet it all felt so good, so right.

“Spaceship” is a song about escape, a great listen for these human reminders. Perfectly simple, perfectly slow, with just the right amount of absence and minor chords. George Holman’s euphonious voice becomes the escape with lines like “You do your best but the world doesn’t make any sense to you” and “I can hear the sea even though I’m in the city.” He invites the moments when we need to feel. And like the clarity after a good cry, it begins and resolves in the perfect circle of a wind.

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Carrie Seitzinger, Editor-in-Chief of NAILED:

“Steer the Canyon” — Big Black Delta

Big Black Delta’s new album, Trágame Tierra was recently released, much to my delight. I’ve been a long-time fan of Jonathan Bates; I’d go see him play at Highland Grounds in LA when I was 17 years old, back when Mellowdrone was just him and a bunch of instruments and a looper pedal. It’s impressive, given our distracted culture, this musician has been in the game (or studio or stage) so consistently over the last 14+ years.

Trágame Tierra has a shaking pop bliss, electric emotion, and a backbone of beats. Plus there are delicious collaborations between Bates and Debbie Gibson, Kimbra, and Dhani Harrison. It’s clear that Bates hasn’t only been rocking this whole time, he’s been learning along the way. Once you put on these headphones you won’t want to take them off.

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Kevin Meyer, Writer and Contributor to NAILED:

“Daydreaming” – Radiohead

Twenty-three years. That’s the length of Thom Yorke’s relationship with his partner, Rachel Owen, the mother of his two children. Reverse and pitch-correct the back-masked vocals at the ending of Radiohead’s new single “Daydreaming,” and you end up with Yorke repeating the phrase Half of my life, half of my love. Thom Yorke was forty-six years old when he and his partner separated.

It’s math I can empathize with. I left my wife of thirteen years at the age of thirty-five, and watching Yorke walk silently, aimlessly, through door after door, finding himself in strange places that don’t connect to where he was before—a house to a hallway to a beach to an elevator—I know how he feels. Divorce is a time machine. You step into the unique, constructed reality only two people can share, and thirteen or twenty-three years later, when you step out of that reality, the world has changed.

Yorke’s growing frustration—the facial tics, the way he yanks at doors stuck shut, how he shakes his head when a door leads somewhere different than he expected—in the never-ending maze of rooms filled with happy families, long empty corridors, stairways, and vacant parking garages, that’s the way the new world feels sometimes. Familiar places become rotten with old memories, and new places are strange, distant.

Twenty-three doors. That’s the number of doors Thom Yorke opens in Daydreaming before climbing alone into an icy cave, shivering by a small fire, to fitfully fall asleep.

 

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Check out Songs of the Week #44 for even more great music from the editors and contributors behind NAILED.

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